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Since childhood, most of us have been told that brushing and removing sugar and food from our teeth as soon as possible is a good practice for preventing tooth decay and the development of other dental dilemmas. As a result, some of the most dedicated and diligent of patients think it’s a good idea then to rush to the bathroom to brush immediately after that steak dinner. However, in reality, brushing too soon can cause more harm than good for the health and well-being of your teeth. Interested in learning more? Read on to find out how brushing too often can be bad for you:

Don’t Brush Too Soon or Too Often After Eating or Drinking

Again, while it might sound counterintuitive, in reality it is critically important to actually wait before brushing your teeth after a meal. Here’s why:

  • You Can Make Erosion and Decay Worse — Let’s pretend you just finished drinking a soda. Your first instinct is to go brush your teeth to get all the carbonic acid and sugar removed from your teeth. However, in reality this can damage the enamel of your teeth by spreading the unsettled acids and sugars around the surface of the tooth potentially causing more damage.

  • Enamel is Temporarily Weakened — Going hand in hand with the above point, enamel is temporarily weakened when put in contact with acidic substances such as food and drink. In this weakened state, enamel is more susceptible to damage and erosion from outside sources — including a thorough brusher. In these cases, you can potentially damage and brush away the weakened enamel.

  • Brushing Too Much is Bad— Even if you wait an acceptable amount of time after a meal to brush, if you brush after every time you eat or drink something you can also cause damage. Though it’s amongst the hardest substances in the body, enamel can only take so much wear and tear in a day, and brushing can contribute to that wear and tear. Most dental professionals believe that once you brush more than three times in a single given day, you actually start to cause more harm than good for your teeth.

As a result, you should always limit your brushing to twice a day at least 30-60 minutes after a meal in order to avoid potentially damaging your teeth. If you have any questions about your brushing habits or schedule, or would like to schedule an appointment, contact Lakeway Center for Cosmetic & Family Dentistry today.